Fascinating discoveries – both our own and others’

Brain activity in customer research

By |2018-12-03T16:51:47+00:00December 3rd, 2018|Customer experience research|

How monitoring brain activity can help us better understand customer and employee experience In this final post in our series about the different methodologies for investigating customer and employee experience (read our full academic paper), we’re going to look at some of the ways of actually scanning the human brain and visualising the activity

What can our eyes and face really tell us about customer experience?

By |2018-11-20T13:11:41+00:00November 16th, 2018|Customer experience research|

Windows to the mind In a recent post, we looked at some of the measures of internal physiology – like heart rate and EDA – that can help us to understand the drivers of customer behaviour - the Tripping Points® as we call them. Today we’ll review some of the other methods outlined in

Why don’t we seem to like Estate Agents and Car Dealers?

By |2018-11-13T11:20:41+00:00November 12th, 2018|Customer experience research, Customer experience stories, Customer experience strategy|

Why buying a house is as bad as buying a car …and vice versa Why is it that we humans seem so against the idea of paying commission to sales people, brokers or agents, and yet are happy to contribute tips – on top of the actual price of their meal – to waiting

Biometric research – how it can improve customer experience

By |2018-12-06T13:45:22+00:00October 17th, 2018|Customer experience research|

It was recently announced that both Hyundai and Toyota are investing in a Perceptive Automata, a company dedicated to helping autonomous vehicles to understand humans better. While this of course is a very worthwhile aim (and the resulting software could revolutionise driverless cars), I couldn’t help but feel that it highlighted how much more

Using biometrics in customer research

By |2018-12-06T13:36:01+00:00September 25th, 2018|Customer experience research, Customer experience strategy, Customer survey|

Last week saw the publication of our first co-authored paper reviewing physiological and neuroscientific methods for investigating customer research and employee research. In this article, I’d like to reflect on how these exciting methods can be used to help businesses better understand their customers and staff and how that insight should be used to

How science can help us better understand customer experience

By |2018-09-22T17:44:07+00:00September 18th, 2018|Customer experience research, customer surveys|

In a previous post (customer surveys are a  waste of time) we said to stop wasting time on meaningless customer surveys. A bold statement but one we stick to as most customers surveys are poorly designed, they do not provide useful insight and it seems their sole purpose is to provide meaningless stats to

Customer surveys are a waste of time

By |2018-09-03T17:12:24+00:00July 27th, 2018|Customer experience research, Customer survey|

Customer surveys do not work Let’s consider the advancement in behavioural science which broadly tells us that most of our decisions in life occur unconsciously. Even those big conscious decisions (who to marry, which house to buy, fast car vs one that fits the children etc) are influenced by our unconscious, inbuilt bias, past

Learn about the psychology and physiology of customer experience

By |2018-07-20T12:16:32+00:00July 20th, 2018|Customer experience research, Customer experience strategy|

Learn about the psychology and physiology of customer experience in a recent webinar from Pearson Business School. The webinar features Dr Harry Witchel from Brighton & Sussex Medical School, Sam Johnson from M&S and our co-founder Tim Routledge discussing how neuroscience and physiology are key elements in customer experience. Dr

Behavioural science CX experiment findings

By |2018-06-15T09:24:32+00:00June 14th, 2018|Customer experience research, Customer experience strategy|

People don't do what they say Much of the thinking in the world of customer experience has been developed by asking customers or employee questions. The issue with this is that people don't do what they say. Our unconscious, for the most part, is in charge. Asking people the what's and why's does not

Customer Experience Experiment

By |2018-05-09T16:27:19+00:00May 9th, 2018|Customer experience research|

Games People Play. Your chance to take part in our simple yet ground-breaking experiment to further the understanding of human behaviour… Most customer experience approaches have been developed through conventional research from customers and employees. These traditional methods ask people about what they do and the reasons why. CX Lab is seeking to challenge

Giving up personal details is as stressful as a panic attack

By |2018-04-19T15:26:07+00:00April 19th, 2018|Customer experience research|

Giving up personal details is as stressful as a panic attack A somewhat dramatic headline, isn't it?! Our recent blog posts have focused on Tripping Points®. These are the moments of unexpected stress for customers. Let's now dive in deeper to show you some of our own CX Lab research discoveries. Stressful findings In a

The secret ingredient for improving customer experience: Tripping Points

By |2018-07-20T11:27:20+00:00April 3rd, 2018|Customer experience research|

Imagine you can go beyond customer surveys and interviews.   Imagine you can directly see how customer interactions happen in real life and how they feel.  That’s one of the cornerstones of our CX Lab approach to customer experience.  We call our insight CX Lab Tests.  We seek to find out how customers respond and feel

Step into your customers’ shoes using ethnography

By |2018-02-02T18:47:47+00:00February 2nd, 2018|Customer experience research|

What is ethnography? Ethnography is one of the methods we use in our CX Lab Tests.  Although it’s not a new research method, it’s not yet used to its full potential by businesses.  We’re always excited by the insights revealed by our ethnographic research.  If you’d like to know more about what exactly ethnography is,

The unconscious way our senses influence the customer experience

By |2018-12-08T15:15:18+00:00January 19th, 2018|Customer experience research|

The unconscious way our senses influence the customer experience Why should it be that hearing the sound of a creaking door should make people rate their back as feeling stiffer or that sitting in a blue room with soft carpet, gentle music and a lavender fragrance would make customers more likely to accept higher