Behavioural research is more important than ever

By |2020-06-03T17:34:18+01:00June 3rd, 2020|Behavioural Science, Customer experience research, Customer experience strategy|

Behavioural research is more important than ever. You don’t need us to tell you that customer behaviour has changed over these last few months. Queuing outside supermarkets, increased online shopping and social distancing have changed the way we do things. For many, this is a stressful time. Understanding this new customer anxiety, emotion and behaviour

User experience – the secret to improving it

By |2020-03-13T12:39:15+00:00September 6th, 2019|Customer experience research, User experience|

User Experience - the secret to improving it Understanding any aspect of human behaviour like user experience is never as straightforward as we would like. If humans were the conscious, rational decision makers we used to believe then human study would be simple. We would just ask people about what they did and why

Emotional Connection – The Big Lie

By |2020-01-06T13:51:03+00:00July 22nd, 2019|Customer experience research|

Is Emotion the key to customer experience differentiation? There appears to be a popular narrative at the moment about the need for brands and experiences to create positive emotional connections for customers. Emotion and customer experience appear to be key partners. Only recently Forrester announced: “Emotion Holds The Key To Achieving CX Differentiation -

How science can help us better understand customer experience

By |2019-10-25T19:52:52+01:00September 18th, 2018|Customer experience research, customer surveys|

The psychology and physiology of customer experience In a previous post (customer surveys are a  waste of time) we said to stop wasting time on meaningless customer surveys. A bold statement but one we stick to as most customers surveys are poorly designed, they do not provide useful insight and it seems their sole purpose

Learn about the psychology and physiology of customer experience

By |2019-10-25T19:56:45+01:00July 20th, 2018|Customer experience research, Customer experience strategy|

Learn about the psychology and physiology of customer experience in a recent webinar from Pearson Business School. The webinar features Dr Harry Witchel from Brighton & Sussex Medical School, Sam Johnson from M&S and our co-founder Tim Routledge discussing how neuroscience and physiology are key elements in customer experience. [/fusion_text][/fusion_builder_column][/fusion_builder_row][/fusion_builder_container] Dr Harry Witchel talks passionately

Giving up personal details is as stressful as a panic attack

By |2018-04-19T15:26:07+01:00April 19th, 2018|Customer experience research|

Giving up personal details is as stressful as a panic attack A somewhat dramatic headline, isn't it?! Our recent blog posts have focused on Tripping Points®. These are the moments of unexpected stress for customers. Let's now dive in deeper to show you some of our own CX Lab research discoveries. Stressful findings In a

3 Tripping Points of the customer experience

By |2018-04-19T12:10:33+01:00April 12th, 2018|Customer experience strategy|

3 Tripping Points of the customer experience And why customers are like cats In the last blog post I explained Tripping Points.  (You can read it here). Tripping Points is a research method that lets us find out how customers react in real time to their experience. Whether that be in a shop, online, calling

The secret ingredient for improving customer experience: Tripping Points

By |2018-07-20T11:27:20+01:00April 3rd, 2018|Customer experience research|

Imagine you can go beyond customer surveys and interviews.   Imagine you can directly see how customer interactions happen in real life and how they feel.  That’s one of the cornerstones of our CX Lab approach to customer experience.  We call our insight CX Lab Tests.  We seek to find out how customers respond and feel

The unconscious way our senses influence the customer experience

By |2018-12-08T15:15:18+00:00January 19th, 2018|Customer experience research|

The unconscious way our senses influence the customer experience Why should it be that hearing the sound of a creaking door should make people rate their back as feeling stiffer or that sitting in a blue room with soft carpet, gentle music and a lavender fragrance would make customers more likely to accept higher

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